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  • II. Introduction
    • A. Background & History
    • B. Collective Intelligence
    • C. We the People
    • D. Executive Summary
    • E. Collaboration & Networks: Section II.E
      • 1. The Collective: Section II.E.1
        • a. Categories & Forums: Section II.E.1.a - In this subsection, we will discuss the various categories and forums available within The Collective platform. Users can participate in different sections based on their interests and expertise.
        • b. Topics & Threads: Section II.E.1.b - This subsection will explore how topics and threads are organized within The Collective. Users can create new topics or contribute to existing ones, promoting focused discussions.
        • c. Posts & Replies: Section II.E.1.c - Here, we will delve into the process of posting and replying within The Collective. Users can share their thoughts, ask questions, and engage in meaningful conversations with others.
        • d. User Profiles: Section II.E.1.d - This subsection will highlight the importance of user profiles within The Collective. Users can create and customize their profiles, showcasing their background, expertise, and contributions.
        • e. Moderators & Administrators: Section II.E.1.e - In this section, we will discuss the roles of moderators and administrators in The Collective. They ensure community guidelines are followed, resolve conflicts, and maintain a positive environment.
        • f. Search Function: Section II.E.1.f - This subsection will focus on the search function within The Collective. Users can easily find relevant topics, threads, and user profiles using the search feature.
        • g. External Social Networks: Section II.E.1.g - Here, we will explore the integration of The Collective with external social networks, expanding the reach and visibility of discussions. We will discuss specific platforms such as:
          • i. Facebook: Section II.E.1.g.i - This subsection will discuss the integration of The Collective with Facebook, enabling users to share content and engage in discussions through the social media platform.
          • ii. Facebook Groups: Section II.E.1.g.ii - Refers to the integration of Facebook Groups. This subsection focuses on how The Collective utilizes or interacts with Facebook Groups to expand its reach and facilitate discussions.
          • iii. Twitter: Section II.E.1.g.iii - This subsection will focus on the integration of The Collective with Twitter. Users can share forum threads or individual posts on Twitter, facilitating broader conversations.
          • iv. LinkedIn: Section II.E.1g.iv - Here, we will discuss the integration of The Collective with LinkedIn, allowing professionals to connect their profiles and share relevant discussions with their network.
          • v. Google: Section II.E.1.g.v - In this subsection, we will explore the integration of The Collective with Google, enabling users to discover and engage with forum content through Google search and related services.
        • h. Rules & Guidelines: Section II.E.1.h - This section will cover the rules and guidelines that govern user behavior and interactions within The Collective. Clear guidelines help maintain a respectful and inclusive community.
          • i. Exploitation: Section II.E.1.h.i - Here, we will address the issue of exploitation within The Collective and discuss measures in place to prevent misuse of the platform for personal gain or harmful purposes.
          • ii. Identification: Section II.E.1.h.ii - This subsection will focus on the importance of user identification within The Collective. Users may need to verify their identity to ensure a trustworthy and reliable community.
          • iii. SPAM: Section II.E.1.h.iii - In this subsection, we will discuss the measures taken to prevent and address spam within The Collective. Spamming can disrupt discussions and hinder a positive user experience.
        • i. The Collective Message Board Forum: Section II.E.1.i - This section will provide an overview of The Collective's dedicated message board forum. Users can access this space for general announcements, feedback, and community-wide discussions.
          • III. The United States Federal Government
            • B. Legislative Branch: Section III.B - description.
              • 1. Definition & Role: Section III.B.1
              • 2. Structure & Composition: Section III.B.2
                • a. Congress: Section III.B.2.a - Congress is the primary body of the legislative branch and is responsible for making federal laws. It is bicameral, meaning it has two separate chambers.
                  • i. House of Representatives: Section III.B.2.a.i - The House of Representatives, often referred to as the House, is the lower chamber of Congress. It is composed of 435 members, each representing a specific congressional district. Members are elected every two years, and the number of representatives from each state is based on its population.
                  • ii. Senate: Section III.B.2.a.ii - The Senate is the upper chamber of Congress and is composed of 100 senators, two from each state, regardless of population. Senators serve six-year terms, with one-third of the Senate up for election every two years.
                • b. Leadership: Section III.B.2.b - description.
                  • i. House of Representatives: Section III.B.2.b.i - The House is led by the Speaker of the House, who is the highest-ranking member and is responsible for setting the legislative agenda. The House also has other leadership roles, such as the Majority and Minority Leaders, Majority and Minority Whips, and committee chairs.
                  • ii. Senate: Section III.B.2.b.ii - The Vice President of the United States serves as the President of the Senate, with the power to cast tie-breaking votes. The Senate also has leadership positions, including the Majority Leader, Minority Leader, and committee chairs.
                • c. Committees: Section III.B.2.c - Both the House and the Senate have committees that specialize in various policy areas, such as appropriations, foreign affairs, finance, and more. These committees play a crucial role in reviewing and shaping legislation before it reaches the floor for a full vote.
                • d. Legislation: Section III.B.2.d - Members of Congress, both in the House and the Senate, can introduce bills and resolutions. The legislative process involves committee review, debate, and voting on these bills. For a bill to become law, it must pass both chambers and be signed by the President.

                  • Cornerstone Laws of the United States
                  • i. The Homestead Act of 1862: Section III.B.2.d.i - This act allowed individuals to claim up to 160 acres of federal land for a small fee, provided they improved the land by building a dwelling and cultivating crops. After five years, they could apply for full ownership of the land.
                  • ii. The Civil Rights Act of 1964: Section III.B.2.d.ii - Description.
                  • iii. The Social Security Act of 1935: Section III.B.2.d.iii - Description.
                  • iv. The Clean Air Act of 1963: Section III.B.2.d.iv - Description.
                  • v. The Voting Rights Act of 1965: Section III.B.2.d.v - Description.
                  • vi. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990: Section III.B.2.d.vi - Description.
                  • vii. The Equal Pay Act of 1963: Section III.B.2.d.vii - Description.
                  • viii. The First Amendment to the United States Constitution: Section III.B.2.d.viii - Description.
                  • ix. The Fair Housing Act of 1968: Section III.B.2.d.ix - Description.
                  • x. The Affordable Care Act of 2010: Section III.B.2.d.x - Description.
                  • xi. General Mining Law of 1872: Section III.B.2.d.xi - The General Mining Law of 1872, enacted on May 10, 1872, laid the foundation for mineral resource extraction on federal lands in the United States and has shaped the nation's history and development.
                  • xii. United States Constitution: Section III.B.2.d.xii - This paper offers a comprehensive historical analysis of the United States Constitution, from its conception during the 1787 Constitutional Convention to its enduring significance in contemporary American governance, exploring its drafting, ratification, amendments, and ongoing role in shaping the nation's political and legal landscape.
                  • xiii. Pacific Railroad Act of 1862: Section III.B.2.d.xiii - DESCRIPTION
                  • xiv. Pacific Railroad Act of 1864: Section III.B.2.d.xiv - DESCRIPTION
                • e. Impeachment: Section III.B.2.e - The House of Representatives has the power to impeach federal officials, including the President, which is the first step in the process of removing an official from office. The Senate then holds a trial to determine whether to convict and remove the official.
                • f. Oversight: Section III.B.2.f - Congress has the authority to conduct oversight of the executive branch, including reviewing the actions and policies of federal agencies and officials.
              • 3. Powers & Responsibilities: Section III.B.3
        • IV. Investment & Trading Testable Hypothesis: Section IV - In this section, we will present our overarching hypothesis that forms the foundation of our trading approach. It outlines the core principles and assumptions upon which our strategy is based.
          • A. Statistical Validity & Strict Discipline: Section IV.A - In this section, we delve into the significance of statistical validity and the need for maintaining strict discipline in our investment and trading approach. These factors are essential for ensuring the reliability and integrity of our strategy.
            • 1. Optimal Sample Size: Section IV.A.1 - Determining the optimal sample size is essential for achieving statistical validity. It involves selecting a sufficient number of data points or observations to provide reliable and representative results. By using an appropriate sample size, we aim to minimize sampling errors and increase the accuracy of our analysis.
            • 2. Sampling Method: Section IV.A.2 - The sampling method refers to the approach used to select data points from the larger population for analysis. It is important to choose a sampling method that ensures randomness and unbiased representation. Common sampling methods include simple random sampling, stratified sampling, and cluster sampling. The choice of sampling method depends on the nature of the data and research objectives.
            • 3. Control Group vs Experiment Group: Section IV.A.3 - In some cases, it may be necessary to compare the performance of different groups or treatments within an investment strategy. The control group represents the baseline or reference group, while the experiment group involves applying a specific change or intervention. By comparing the performance of these groups, we can assess the impact of the intervention and evaluate its effectiveness.
            • 4. Statistical Significance: Section IV.A.4 - Statistical significance is a measure of the likelihood that observed results are not due to chance. It helps us determine whether the differences or relationships observed in our data are statistically meaningful. By conducting statistical tests and analyzing p-values or confidence intervals, we can assess the significance of our findings and make informed decisions based on the results.
            • 5. Confounding, Independent, & Dependent Variables: Section IV.A.5 - In investment and trading analysis, it is crucial to identify and account for confounding variables that may influence the relationship between independent and dependent variables. Independent variables are the factors or variables we manipulate or control, while dependent variables are the outcomes or variables we measure or observe. Confounding variables are additional factors that can impact the relationship between the independent and dependent variables. Properly accounting for these variables helps ensure the accuracy and reliability of our analysis. These statistical considerations provide a solid foundation for our investment and trading approach, allowing us to make informed decisions based on reliable data and analysis.
          • B. Trade Volume: Section IV.B - Trade volume refers to the number of shares or contracts traded within a specified period. It is an important metric in investment and trading analysis as it provides insights into market liquidity and investor participation. Analyzing trade volume patterns can help identify trends, assess market sentiment, and determine the level of interest in a particular asset.
          • C. Price Percentage Change: Section IV.C - Price percentage change measures the percentage increase or decrease in the price of an asset over a given period. It is a commonly used metric to assess the volatility and performance of investments. By tracking price percentage changes, investors can identify trends, assess market movements, and make informed decisions based on the observed price dynamics.
          • D. Bollinger Bands: Section IV.D - Bollinger Bands are a technical analysis tool that consists of a set of lines plotted two standard deviations above and below a moving average. These bands provide a visual representation of price volatility and can be used to identify potential overbought or oversold conditions in the market. Traders often use Bollinger Bands to generate trading signals and determine entry and exit points for their positions.
          • E. Trend Following Strategy: Section IV.E - A trend-following strategy is an investment approach that aims to profit from identifying and riding trends in the market. It involves analyzing price movements and identifying upward or downward trends. Trend followers typically enter positions in the direction of the prevailing trend and exit when the trend shows signs of reversing. This strategy assumes that trends persist and that by following them, investors can capture profits.
          • F. Bandwidth: Section IV.F - In the context of Bollinger Bands, bandwidth refers to the width between the upper and lower bands. It provides a measure of volatility and can be used to assess the potential for price breakouts or reversals. A narrower bandwidth indicates lower volatility, while a wider bandwidth suggests higher volatility.
          • G. High-frequency vs Low-frequency Trading: Section IV.G - High-frequency trading (HFT) and low-frequency trading (LFT) refer to different approaches to trading based on the frequency and speed of executing trades. HFT involves using sophisticated algorithms and high-speed technology to execute a large number of trades within very short timeframes, often measured in milliseconds. LFT, on the other hand, involves longer holding periods and fewer trades. Both approaches have their advantages and considerations, and the choice depends on the investor's strategy, resources, and risk tolerance.
          • H. Market Price vs Intrinsic Value: Section IV.H - The market price of an asset is the current price at which it is being traded in the market. Intrinsic value, on the other hand, represents the underlying fundamental value of the asset, based on factors such as earnings, cash flows, and other relevant metrics. Investors analyze the relationship between market price and intrinsic value to identify potential discrepancies. Buying assets below their intrinsic value and selling them above it is a common objective for value investors.
          • I. Trading Fee Impact: Section IV.I - Trading fees or transaction costs incurred when buying or selling assets can have an impact on investment returns. It is important to consider the impact of these fees when assessing the profitability of trades. High trading fees can erode potential gains or amplify losses. Investors often seek to minimize trading fees by choosing cost-effective brokers or employing strategies that reduce the frequency of trades.
          • J. Scientific Method Statistics Included: Section IV.J - Applying the scientific method to investment and trading analysis involves using statistical techniques to test hypotheses, analyze data, and draw conclusions. By employing statistical methods such as regression analysis, hypothesis testing, and correlation analysis, investors can make data-driven decisions and gain insights into the relationships and patterns within financial markets.
          • K. Population Selection: Section IV.K - Population selection refers to the process of choosing the group or population from which data will be collected and analyzed. It is important to select a population that is representative of the target market or investment universe. The population selection criteria may include factors such as geographic location, industry sector, market capitalization, or any other relevant characteristics. The goal of population selection is to ensure that the data collected and analyzed accurately reflects the broader market or specific segment being studied. This allows for more meaningful insights and conclusions to be drawn from the analysis.
          • L. Mitigating & Recovery of Losses: Section IV.L - Mitigating and recovering losses is a crucial aspect of investment and trading strategies. In this section, we explore various approaches and techniques to minimize losses and potentially recover from them.
            • 1. Averaging: Section IV.L.1 - Averaging, also known as dollar-cost averaging, is a technique where an investor consistently invests a fixed amount of money into an asset at regular intervals, regardless of its price. By doing so, the investor buys more shares when prices are low and fewer shares when prices are high. This strategy aims to reduce the impact of short-term price fluctuations and potentially lower the average cost of the investment over time.
            • 2. Buyback: Section IV.L.2 - Buyback refers to the repurchase of outstanding shares by a company. From an investor's perspective, buying back shares can signal confidence from the company and potentially increase shareholder value. When a company repurchases its own shares, it reduces the total number of shares in circulation, which can lead to an increase in the value of the remaining shares.
            • 3. Cash Reserves: Section IV.L.3 - Maintaining cash reserves is a risk management strategy that involves setting aside a portion of the portfolio in cash or highly liquid assets. Cash reserves provide flexibility and liquidity, allowing investors to take advantage of investment opportunities as they arise or to meet financial obligations. In times of market downturns or uncertainty, cash reserves can act as a cushion, mitigating potential losses.
            • 4. Investing vs Trading: Section IV.L.4 - Investing and trading represent different approaches to participating in financial markets. Investing typically involves a longer-term perspective, focusing on the fundamental analysis of assets and seeking to generate returns over an extended period. Trading, on the other hand, involves shorter-term buying and selling of assets, often driven by technical analysis and market timing. Both approaches have their advantages and considerations, and investors may choose to incorporate elements of both in their strategies.
            • 5. Writing Off: Section IV.L.5 - Writing off refers to the process of acknowledging and accepting losses by reducing the value of an investment or asset on the books. When an investment becomes significantly impaired or no longer holds the expected value, investors may choose to write off a portion or the entire investment. This accounting practice allows investors to reflect the true value of the investment and potentially offset the losses against taxable income.
            • 6. Compounding Investment Strategy: Section IV.L.6 - Compounding is a strategy where investment returns are reinvested, allowing the investment to grow exponentially over time. By reinvesting returns, investors can earn returns on their initial investment as well as the accumulated returns. Compounding can lead to significant growth over long periods, taking advantage of the power of compounding returns.
          • M. Trading & Investment Strategy Process: Section IV.M - Here, we will discuss the step-by-step process we follow when executing trades and investments. We will provide a detailed explanation of the strategy, including the tools and indicators we utilize to make informed decisions.
            • 1. Process Legend: Section IV.M.1 - This subsection will serve as a legend or key to understanding the specific elements and components of our trading process. It will provide a comprehensive explanation of the terminology, variables, and concepts involved.
              • a. Trigger Variables: Section IV.M.1.a - The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive framework for evaluating financial assets before trading, utilizing specific quantitative metrics and trigger variables. The goal is to enhance decision-making accuracy and risk management in trading by systematically assessing market conditions and asset performance.
              • b. Confounding Variables: Section IV.M.1.b - Explores the concept of confounding variables in trading and investment strategies. It discusses the external factors that may influence market behavior and potentially confound the relationship between trigger variables and trade outcomes. The identification and management of confounding variables are crucial for accurate analysis and decision-making.
                • i. Market Sentiment: Section IV.M.1.b.i - Focuses on market sentiment as a confounding variable. It examines how investor emotions, perceptions, and overall market mood can impact trading decisions and market dynamics. The significance of understanding and incorporating market sentiment analysis into the trading strategy is discussed.
                • ii. News-Events: Section IV.M.1.b.ii - Discusses the influence of news and events as confounding variables. It explores how major news announcements, economic indicators, corporate earnings, and geopolitical events can affect market behavior and introduce additional volatility and unpredictability. The considerations and strategies related to incorporating news and event analysis into the trading process are highlighted.
                • iii. Market Volatility: Section IV.M.1.b.iii - Examines market volatility as a confounding variable. It delves into the measurement and analysis of market volatility using various indicators and tools. The impact of volatility on trade execution, risk management, and strategy performance is explored, along with techniques for adapting to changing market conditions.
                • iv. Availability of Information: Section IV.M.1.b.iv - Focuses on the availability of information as a confounding variable. It discusses how the accessibility and timeliness of market data, research reports, and other information sources can influence decision-making and trade outcomes. The importance of reliable and up-to-date information in the trading process is emphasized.
                • v. Trading Incentives: Section IV.M.1.b.v - Examines trading incentives as confounding variables. It explores how incentives such as rebates, promotions, and bonuses offered by brokers or trading platforms can impact trading decisions. The considerations and potential biases introduced by trading incentives are discussed, along with the importance of aligning incentives with long-term trading goals.
                • vi. Type of Asset Traded: Section IV.M.1.b.vi - Discusses the type of asset traded as a confounding variable. It explores how different asset classes, such as stocks, bonds, commodities, or cryptocurrencies, can exhibit unique characteristics and behaviors. The considerations and strategies specific to each asset class are examined to account for their impact on trading outcomes.
                • vii. Type of Broker: Section IV.M.1.b.vii - Focuses on the type of broker as a confounding variable. It examines the role of brokers in executing trades and the various types of brokers available, such as full-service brokers, discount brokers, or online brokers. The impact of broker services, fees, and trading platforms on the trading process is explored.
                • viii. Trading Platform: Section IV.M.1.b.viii - Discusses the trading platform as a confounding variable. It explores the features, functionalities, and user experience of trading platforms used for executing trades. The impact of trading platform technology, order execution speed, and reliability on the trading process and outcomes is examined.
                • ix. Geographic Location: Section IV.M.1.b.ix - Examines geographic location as a confounding variable. It explores how regional factors, such as time zone differences, market regulations, and economic conditions, can influence trading opportunities and outcomes. The considerations and strategies for adapting to geographic variations in the trading environment are discussed.
                • x. Investor Experience: Section IV.M.1.b.x - Delves into the significance of investor experience as a confounding variable. It explores how an investor's level of knowledge, skill, and past trading experience can impact decision-making and trade outcomes. The importance of self-awareness, continuous learning, and adapting strategies based on one's experience is discussed. The section also highlights the potential biases and challenges that can arise from both novice and seasoned investors and provides insights on how to leverage experience to improve trading performance.
              • c. Dependent & Independent Variables: Section IV.M.1.c - This section explores the dependent and independent variables used in the investment and trading strategy process. It focuses on identifying and analyzing the key factors that affect the performance and outcomes of the strategy.
                • i. Asset Protocol: Section IV.M.1.c.i - The asset protocol, discussed in this section, outlines the guidelines and procedures for selecting and evaluating different types of assets within the investment and trading strategy. It helps determine which assets to include in the portfolio and how to assess their potential for generating returns.
                • ii. Average Price Paid Protocol: Section IV.M.1.c.ii - The average price paid protocol, covered in this section, outlines the methodology used to calculate the average price at which assets are acquired within the investment and trading strategy. It helps determine the entry points for buying assets and provides insights into the cost basis of the portfolio.
                • iii. Average Price Sold Protocol: Section IV.M.1.c.iii - The average price sold protocol, discussed in this section, outlines the methodology used to calculate the average price at which assets are sold within the investment and trading strategy. It helps determine the exit points for selling assets and provides insights into the realized gains or losses.
                • iv. Frequency Protocol: Section IV.M.1.c.iv - The frequency protocol, covered in this section, defines the frequency at which trades are executed within the investment and trading strategy. It outlines the guidelines and considerations for determining how often assets are bought and sold, which can impact the overall portfolio performance.
                • v. Buyback Protocol (BP): Section IV.M.1.c.v - The buyback protocol, discussed in this section, outlines the guidelines and procedures for repurchasing assets that were previously sold within the investment and trading strategy. It helps determine the conditions under which assets can be reacquired, potentially allowing for capitalizing on favorable market conditions.
                • vi. Sell-back Protocol: Section IV.M.1.c.vi - The sell-back protocol, covered in this section, outlines the guidelines and procedures for reselling assets that were previously bought within the investment and trading strategy. It helps determine the conditions under which assets can be resold, potentially allowing for capitalizing on profitable positions or mitigating losses.
                • vii. Regressive Trend Protocol: Section IV.M.1.c.vii - The regressive trend protocol, discussed in this section, focuses on identifying and responding to regressive trends in the market within the investment and trading strategy. It outlines the guidelines and procedures for adjusting the portfolio based on the detection of downward trends to minimize potential losses.
                • viii. Limit Protocol (LP): Section IV.M.1.c.viii - XIIMM's investment and trading strategy centers around strategically utilizing the Limit Protocol (LP) and a systematic approach to capitalize on price differentials, minimize risks through limit orders, and achieve more favorable execution prices, all while fostering transparent communication and education within the trading community.
                • ix. Stop Limit Protocol (SLP): Section IV.M.1.c.ix - The stop limit protocol, referred to as SLP, is discussed in this section. It outlines the guidelines and procedures for setting stop limit orders within the investment and trading strategy. It helps determine the trigger price and the limit price, allowing for automated execution of trades when the market reaches specified levels, potentially protecting against significant losses.
                • x. Trailing Stop Limit Protocol (TSLP): Section IV.M.1.c.x - The trailing stop limit protocol, referred to as TSLP, is explained in this section. It outlines the guidelines and procedures for setting trailing stop limit orders within the investment and trading strategy. It allows for adjusting the stop price based on a trailing percentage, aiming to protect profits and limit potential losses as the market price fluctuates.
                • xi. Staggered Order Protocol (SOP): Section IV.M.1.c.xi - A trading strategy or protocol that involves placing multiple orders with different parameters in a systematic and staggered manner. The SOP is designed to manage risk, optimize entry or exit points, and take advantage of potential price fluctuations in the financial markets.
                • xii. Dollar Cost Average Protocol (DCAP): Section IV.M.1.c.xii - An investment strategy that involves regularly investing a fixed amount of money at consistent intervals, aiming to mitigate the impact of market volatility and accumulate assets over time.
        • VI. Wealth & Taxes























































































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        • VII. Prospecting & Mining
          • A. Background & History























































































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        • VIII. Annotated Bibliographical References























































































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